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Plantar Fibroma Exercises

The jury is still out on what causes plantar fibroma, but if you suffer from it, you know just how uncomfortable the condition can be.

While there are treatment options for plantar fibroma, the best way to both prevent and reduce pain associated with it is to incorporate regular plantar fibroma exercises into your schedule.

These will help to stretch the plantar fascia, keep the muscles and tendons loose, and build strength in the foot.

What Is Plantar Fibroma?

Plantar fibroma is a foot condition in which you develop a hard lump underneath your foot, usually in the arch but sometimes closer to the ball of the foot or the heel.

This hard mass can be painful and cause discomfort when you’re wearing shoes as pressure is placed directly on the lump. Usually, this is a result of the lump pushing on nerves and soft tissues, and not pain directly in the lump.

Plantar fibroma may occur in just one foot, or it can develop in both feet. You may also develop multiple fibromas in one or both feet, which is then known as plantar fibromatosis or Ledderhose Disease.

It’s a progressive condition, which means that without treatment the plantar fibroma can continue to grow up to an inch in size. Plantar fibroma insoles can help the pain but won’t make it better.

Although they are technically labeled as a tumor, plantar fibroma are benign.

Regardless, if you have a plantar fibroma that you can feel underneath your foot, it’s wise to get it checked by your doctor while it’s still in the beginning stages to try and prevent it from progressing and becoming problematic later.

Strength and Stretching Program

Building strength in your plantar fascia and making sure it’s always stretched and holding minimal tension will both be extremely helpful for reducing pain associated with plantar fibroma.

Strength-building and stretching should be included in your treatment plan and should become a part of your daily routine if you suffer from plantar fibroma.

You should focus on stretching not only the plantar fascia, but also the Achilles tendon. Building strong calves and keeping the foot muscles strong can also help.

Doing regular stretching and exercise will also help to improve the circulation in both the Achilles tendon and the plantar fascia, helping them heal faster and reducing inflammation.

Exercises for Plantar Fibroma

1. Heel Raise

You can hold onto a railing or a sturdy chair so that you can maintain your balance as you do this exercise. Make sure each part of the movement is controlled and done slowly.

You will need a slightly elevated surface or step to perform this exercise. Start the movement by keeping the balls of your feet flat and on the edge of the bottom step, while your heels are hanging off the edge.

Then gently lower your heels towards the ground and hold this position for 5 to 10 seconds. You should feel a gentle stretch in your calf muscle.

Slowly bring your heels back up to the edge of the step by rising onto the balls of your feet.

Repeat this stretch for 2 sets of 10 reps, once a day.

2. Floor Sitting Ankle Inversion With Resistance

For this exercise, you’re going to need a light resistance band.

Start this exercise by sitting upright on the floor with your legs extended straight out in front of you. Place one end of the resistance band around the ball of your left foot, while holding the other end tightly in your hands.

Place your left leg over your right leg, hooking the resistance band under the ball of your right foot, with the loop still on your left foot. You’ll need to maintain the tension in the band.

Then slowly move your left foot away from your right foot, against the resistance of the band. Hold this position for 5 to 10 seconds and then slowly return to the starting position.

The movement should only come from your ankle! There should be no movement from your hip or your knee throughout the entire stretch.

Repeat this movement for 2 sets of 10 reps and then switch your legs and repeat the steps.

3. Marble Pick Up

For this exercise, you’re going to need 15 to 20 marbles and a small towel.

Sit in a chair and keep your feet flat on the floor. Place the marbles on the floor in front of your feet.

Position the towel just in front of your feet, making sure to keep it within reach.

Then, using only your toes, pick up the marbles one at a time and place them onto the towel.

Repeat the exercise 3 to 5 times on each foot.

4. Towel Scrunches

Sit in a chair and spread a small towel lengthwise in front of you, but keeping the one end within reach.

Then, using only the toes on your right foot, start curling the end of the towel that’s closest to you and scrunch it up towards you. Keep scrunching until you have scrunched up the entire length of the towel.

Use your toes to straighten the towel out again and repeat the exercise with your left foot.

Repeat this exercise 10 times on each foot.